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NACAC Opposes the Senate’s Partial Reauthorization of the Higher Education Act

Contact:
Michael Rose
703-299-6817

Arlington, VA (Sept. 27, 2019) – The National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) expressed its disappointment today over the US Senate’s attempt to tie important funding for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other minority-serving institutions to a partial reauthorization of the Higher Education Act (HEA). The HEA governs how tens of billions of federal student aid dollars are used and holds colleges accountable for the education they provide students.

The Senate proposal would, among other things, provide a permanent funding stream for HBCUs and other minority-serving institutions. But the legislation also eliminates important student protections, such as gainful employment regulations and a 1995 law known as “borrower defense to repayment.” Both rules protect student interests and prevent the misuse of federal financial aid.

“Reauthorization of the Higher Education Act is long overdue and should not be approached as an add-on that could jeopardize funding for HBCUs,” said NACAC CEO Joyce E. Smith. “While there are some provisions in the Senate proposal that NACAC supports, the HEA reauthorization process must be comprehensive and include measures that protect students and taxpayers from unscrupulous colleges. Congress should immediately pass the currently pending bipartisan legislation that would provide funding for HBCUs and other minority-serving institutions.”

 

About NACAC
The National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC), founded in 1937, is an organization of more than 15,000 professionals from around the world dedicated to serving students as they make choices about pursuing postsecondary education. NACAC is committed to maintaining high standards that foster ethical and social responsibility among those involved in the transition process, as outlined in the association's Code of Ethics and Professional Practices.

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