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NACAC Town Halls

 

Join your NACAC colleagues for this occasional series of candid discussions on the impact of racism on college admission. 


How to Practice Anti-Racist School Counseling and College Advising

Date: August 26
Time: 2 – 3:30 p.m. ET
Cost: Free

 

Description: In this, our second town hall, we hope to examine all forms of racism in school and college advising—some we’re aware of and others we aren’t. We’ll delve into how racism impacts our students when they begin the college admission process in high school and as they move through the pipeline to college, and explore how we can incorporate antiracist practices in our processes. Our goal, simply, is to better understand racism in the counseling and advising process and how we can help improve the quality of guidance for all our students.

Panelists:

  • Alicia Oglesby, director of school and college counseling, Bishop McNamara High School (MD)

  • Dr. Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy, dean and professor in the School of Education, American University (DC)

  • Dr. Omari Scott Simmons, director of the business law program, Wake Forest University School of Law (NC)

 

Submit your questions for the moderator and panelists by 11:59 p.m. ET on Friday, August 21.

 


Navigating the Impact of Racism on College Admission Professionals

 

The recent killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd have drawn widespread attention to police brutality and society’s extensive history of racism. Calls for action have reached a fever pitch as people across the country and around the globe demand change.

What does this historic moment mean for the college admission profession? And for our students?

Those questions and more were discussed during a special town hall meeting for NACAC members on June 29, 2020. More than a thousand members tuned in!  

The discussion centered on how the current climate is impacting Black students and other students of color as they navigate the college admission process. The conversation was moderated by journalist Jamaal Abdul-Alim and also delved into the actions individuals — and institutions — can take to become antiracist.


Panelists:

  • Dr. Ted Thornhill, associate professor of sociology, Florida Gulf Coast University

  • Dr. W. Carson Byrd, associate professor of sociology, University of Louisville (KY); 2019 National Center for Institutional Diversity Scholar-in-Residence, University of Michigan

  • Ericka Matthews-Jackson, senior director of undergraduate admissions, Wayne State University (MI); member of NACAC’s Task Force on Standardized Admission Testing for International and US Students

  • Tevera Stith, vice president for KIPP Through College & Career, KIPP DC; member of NACAC’s Ad Hoc Committee on Leadership in College Admission

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